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Smoking cannabis is ‘basic human right’ rules Supreme Court judges

Drug campaigners in Mexico say the case is monumental and could pave the way for further legalisation across the world

Smoking cannabis has been ruled a ‘basic human right’ by the Supreme Court in Mexico.

Although the move doesn’t signify legalisation of the drug , it offers space for lawmakers to look into changing legislation on a state and federal level in the country.

Mexican stance: A demonstration in support of the legalisation of marijuana outside the Supreme Court
Mexican stance: A demonstration in support of the legalisation of marijuana outside the Supreme Court

Judges ruled 4-1 on Wednesday that outlawing the possession and use of the marijuana plant is a violation of fundamental human rights.

Hannah Hetzer of the Drug Policy Alliance says the case is monumental.

“It was argued on human rights grounds, which is unusual, and it’s taking place in Mexico, the epicenter of some of the worst effects of the war on drugs,” she told the Washington Post.

Lighting up: A woman smokes marijuana during a rally in front of the Supreme Court in Mexico
Lighting up: A woman smokes marijuana during a rally in front of the Supreme Court in Mexico

Since 2013, four members of Mexicans United for Responsible and Tolerant Consumption (the acronym SMART in Spanish) have been filing legal arguments to be able to grow, possess and consume marijuana.

The case has argued that it’s all about “the right to the free development of one’s personality,” which Mexico’s constitution supports.

The ruling does not mean it becomes law, but does allow the plaintiffs to now smoke.

It’s thought that it is first declaration of the right to use marijuana as a ‘ fundamental human right ‘.

Flags out: Activists were keen to hear the outcome of the case for depenalising marijuana for recreative use
Activists were keen to hear the outcome of the case for depenalising marijuana for recreative use

Hetzer suspects marijuana legalisation could follow, depending on what happens next: “The big key component that everyone in Mexico talks about in shifting drug policy is whether California legalises in 2016.

“Washington and Colorado are one thing. But with California, with the significance it has and the border it shares with Mexico, if they legalise, it would be too much to ignore.”

Article source Mirror

 

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